Print

Print


I'm having a little trouble reconstructing the common etymon of
<Manann> and <Manawydd> in terms of phonological developments.
Whence the <-dd-> in the Welsh form?  Could Mr. Kondratiev or someone
else help out?

Jim Rader

>
> <<Third, Mananna/n and Manawydan are often said to be cognate, based
> on linguistic similarity of their names.>>
>
> It's more than "linguistic similarity" -- the two names are identical, and
> internal evidence suggests the Welsh name was borrowed from the Irish.
> 'Manawydd' means a Manxman, with the suffix -an imitated from the same
> construction in 'Manannan', interpreted as meaning something like "Great
> Manxman". That they are both "son of Lir/LLyr" could hardly be a coincidence.
> While the figure of Manannan in the most famous Irish literary texts in which
> he is mentioned may appear quite different from Manawyddan in the Mabinogi,
> this may only reflect the limitations of the extant material, and does not
> exhaust the roles he may have played in living oral tradition. Note that
> Manannan in Fiannaiocht has something of the image of the wandering peddler,
> and also displays the qualities of a trickster-figure, dangerous as well as
> beneficent.
>    The familiar Manx image of 'Manannaun Beg Mac-y-Lheir' spinning about on
> his three legs could very easily be a modern folk invention inspired by the
> trinacria, not the other way around.
> Alexei [Kondratiev]
>