Print

Print


If XML is going to be the language to encode and represent databases, the
the issue on Query Languages will ultimately be: what model is the target
database built by. Relational database model and its standard query
language, SQL became a standard  because it is the only model where data in
our complex world can be represented in such a way that can be
mathematically analyzed and understood. Searching a randomly structured XML
database is a hopeless task, no matter what Query Language one uses.
The notion of searching for a Web Browser that will "understand" XML and
display correctly all of the information encoded is just as hopeless. It
will certainly offend, not just the machines that need to process the data,
but people who are not privileged enough to experience sight and sound.

Charles Chou
Icon CMT Corp.

-----Original Message-----
From: Peter Flynn <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
Date: Friday, December 04, 1998 11:38 AM
Subject: Re: Cool XML Websites


>> What would be really nice IMO would be to have a standard way of
>> expressing such queries to let me query the information without having
>> to know what software is holding the information and learn the
>> proprietary APIs. I hope that the QL'98 - The Query Languages Workshop
>> (http://www.w3.org/TandS/QL/QL98/) will get this work started.
>
>Unfortunately all the work I have seen so far on this has been based on
>SQL syntax, which sucks. Commandline query is fine for the knowledgeable
>but most users have a hard enough time coping with simple Booleans.
>
>When is the next Symposium On The Interface?
>
>> It's really a pity that good open standards and nice ideas don't turn
>> into free running code overnight. :)
>
>Does if you add enough beer :-)
>
>///Peter
>