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> This reminds me of using an apostrophe before the word phone (ie: "Miss
> Jones will you get Mr. Smith on the 'phone?") since it is technically a
> contraction of the word telephone.
 
Commonplace until the 70s. And when did you last see 'net ?
 
> This is fascinating. I think you have captured the underlying motive behind
> British usage which seems to be the exact opposite of North American
> motives. Here we must incorporate the new and catchy into the lexicon ASAP
> - fuelled in large part by the media and advertising agencies, both of whom
> have been playing fast and loose with grammatical rules since the 50's.
 
Ummm...nothing wrong with pushing back a few boundaries here and there.
The problem comes when educational standard fall so low the population
loses the ability to distinguish between the genuinely useful new usage
or invention, and the foolish or slipshod usage spawned of ignorance.
Alas our job as printers/typographers is often simply to reproduce our
clients' text as they demand, without correction.
 
> Therefore in the US and Canada you'd find a worldwide bisexual textbook -
> probably at your local GBLT bookstore.
 
Indeed you can, but in the US you soon won't be allowed to talk about it on
TV or over the 'net :-)   I'll have two GBLTs and hold the mayo please...
 
///Peter