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At 09:05 PM 2/25/96 -0500, you wrote:
>Sorry, Marc, but everything I have read agrees with Mark.  When you look at
>the early sources, rather than the medieval, Lance is nowhere to be found.
> The language hunt from Lugh (Lleu) to Lancelot is an interesting theory, and
>since I have no ability in this area I can't comment.  But it would be
>possible to interlink many "Arthurian" figures with some myth/god or another
>of the Celts because of their traits.
>
>Do we have any Dark Age scholars on the list who can straighten us out on
>this?
>
Such as the belief that Arthur was actually an Agricultural God fighting off the heathens... Agricultural being one of the preliminary signs of an emerging civilization.  (Artos has been linked to agriculture and the cymraeg word for bear.)  Is it not possible that there was no early connection?
 
On a slightly different note... The Welsh word "Arddur" pronounced the same as the English "Arthur" means Dark One- anyone ever connected those two or am I just stretching... (Gwynnu also means "The Light One" as in bright... Gwenhwyfar???)
 
Robert AndersA'm swynsei Math, Cyn bum diaered..."
        I had been marked by kind, before I became immortal...
 
                Taliesin, in the Hanes Taliesen
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        "It is Mor Cylch, the maze of life,' Tegid told me. 'It is trodden in darkness with just enough light to see the next step or two ahead, but not more. At each turn the soul must decide whether to journey on or whether to go back the way it came.'
        'What if the soul does not journey one?  What if it chooses to go back the way it came?'
        'Stagnation and death,' Tegid replied with mild vehemence.  He seemed irritated that anyone would consider retreating."
 
                from The Paradise War, by Stephen R. Lawhead
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[log in to unmask]           Robert Anders   Connecticut, USA