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> > Copyright violation might be a potential problem, but I have chosen the
> > first batch of material on my home page carefully with that in mind: (1)
> > The bibliography of fine printing is of course mine. (2) The book on the
> > Kelmscott Press "Golden Legend" is also mine, but I secured permission
> > from the publisher, Neil Shaver of the Yellow Barn Press. (3) Updike's
> > "Style in the Use of Type" was published in 1924. (4) Morris's essay on
> > the Kelmscott Press was published in 1898.
 
> i'm demonstrating my ignorance, since i don't know when
> updike died (separating me neatly from the type-heads),
> but copyright continues for 70 years after the author's death
> over here in the EU. might be a bit marginal...
 
Actually it's death+50 or publication+75, whichever is longer. In the
US, those numbers apply for works published after 1978 or 79 (I forget
which) and before that line, it was 28 years renewable for another 28
and works still under copyright when we joined the rest of
civilization on that particular jot & tittle were eligible for an
additional 19 to bring the total up to 75.
 
There are additional rules for anonymous works, works for hire,
unpublished, collaborations etc.
 
In short, the Updike is probably still under copyright in all places.
 
I'm not sure who owns the copyright or how to research it, but I'd
guess that if the copyright holder can be contacted, a release ought
to be obtainable with minimum hassle.
 
-dh