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Various writers, mostly Dan Beimborn ...
>
> >
> > In Message Wed, 1 Jun 1994 12:25:03 -0500,
> >   Edward A Beimborn <[log in to unmask]> writes:
> >
> > >neat tune to play in different styles. I have found that many times I
> > >personally identify more with the Old-Timey or New England versions of Irish
> > >tunes... Can't explain why, they have that raise-the-hair-on-the-back-of-the
> > >neck sort of feel to them that sometimes I don't get from Celtic.
> >
> > Interesting.  It's the opposite hair-on-the-back-of-the-neck phenomenon for
> > me.  Especially for Irish versions.  Maybe it's my classical and
> > renaissance music background?  Maybe you grew up with more American folk
> > music than I did.
>
> It could be that I play the mandolin- many times I have noticed that a
> plectral instrument is more suited for slides, stops, hammer-on/pull- off,
> etc (the ornaments most suited for OT or NE playing). However, the other
> thing that I really like is the expanded pallette of tune types- Like
> Ragtime, shuffles, etc. I think that this really does dovetail nicely with
> Irish type music as well-
>
Very interesting observation! I started as a child on the violin, and
have recently returned to it (well, fiddle) via a roundabout route that
took me through folk guitar to blues, and then via Doc Watson to
flatpicking fiddle tunes, and bluegrass, to Bill Monroe/David Grisman,
and mandolin.  When I moved to Toronto, I started hanging out at sessions.
There were enough guitarists, so I brought the mandolin, and started
to learn repertoire. The Irish stuff that is 'hair-raising' on the
mandolin is very percussive, but the stuff that I find 'hair-raising' on
the fiddle is 'rolling'.  I find I play different things on fiddle vs.
mandolin vs. guitar, but I also find that when I try to play the same
thing I give it a different emphasis - for example, I play Miss McLeod's
reel on the fiddle, but it comes out as Hop High Ladies on the mandolin.
 
Am I making sense or just drivelling?
 
>    What has proven a somewhat tender spot at our sessions lately is that
> many of us like to play OT or French Candian things as well, sort of to
> throw in some variety as we don't sing much. Well, about half of us are
> Plectrum or fiddle, the other half pipes or whistles. The pipes and whistles
> get very upset if we do OT or New England even though I think it works fine
> on the pipes.
>
Yes! I got some very nasty looks the first time I played Bill Monroe's
'The Gold Rush' at a session... My favourite sessions are those which
do have some variety - not always the case.
 
> About styles not mixing well- I think that this isn't really true. I don't
> think that it takes a huge leap of the mind to play in an unusual style- it
> is like a new tune type. The first time you play a hornpipe, getting the
> bounce takes a while. Then, getting the snap in a strathspey is hard, and so
> is getting the even string of rapid notes for an OT reel. Ragtime is great
> for improving your hornpipe skills. Try "The Dill Pickle" in the Fiddler's
> Fakebook to see what I mean.
>
Or Ragtime Annie...
 
Or take Norman Blake and Tony Rice's arrangement of 'Whiskey Before
Breakfast', or Doc Watson's arrangement of 'Bill Cheatam' and figure
out what they mean on the fiddle or mandolin...
 
wil
--
Wil Macaulay                   email:   [log in to unmask]
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