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>
> Here's one more data point for the single jig discussion:
>
> Matt Cranitch in his book "The Irish Fiddle Book:  The Art of Traditional
> Fiddle Playing" (Mercier Press, Cork & Dublin, 1988) says
>
> "...slides, strictly speaking, are single jigs...The word 'Slide' derives
> from a sliding movement of the dancers.  Through usage, it has come to
> means them;usic that is played, as well as the dance itself.  The term
> 'single jig' is rarely used now in this context.
 
 
Nice to see some dance-based comments on this issue.  To follow up on a
posting from yesterday, in which someone wondered what books printed
single jigs in 6/8, I checked my O'Neill's 1001 last night and most, if
not all, of the single jigs in there are notated in 6/8.
 
I'm still wondering about the lack of polkas as a distinct category in
the early collections.  True, as someone pointed out, there are tunes in
O'Neill's and Roche that are now classed as polkas without being named as
such in those collections.  But there are all those neat Kerry polkas
that are so well-known now that are absent from the turn-of-the-century
books.  Was it that polkas were not as well-established at the time?  Or
that they weren't recognized/accepted by the collectors as "real" Irish
music?  Or were there few Kerrypersons in Chicago during O'Neill's day?
 
Inquiring minds want to know...
 
Paul Wells