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>      John Walsh stated:
>
>      After travelling around searching out sessions for some time, I have
> found that there are a fairly large number of tunes that everyone seems to
> know, but after those, the repertoires change from locale to locale. Tunes
> that are real cliches in some areas are uncommon in others, and every area
> has a few favorites of its own. It might be interesting to find out which
> are the common session tunes in different places.
>
>      (And it might even be useful--these tunes are all in the books, but
> so are scads of others. It might suggest to beginners which among the
> thousands of choices they could start learning.)
>
>      So I invite each of you to name a few of the common session tunes in
> your area.
 
When I play in seisiuns with friends from the North Shore of Massachusetts
a musician will usual say or ask the name of the tune, the ones that I
hear spoken of the most are:
 
    Reels: Maid Behind the Bar, Silver Spear, St. Anne's, Cooley's,     nster;
           Pigeon on the Gate, Swinging on the Gate, Galway Rambler,
           Sally Gardens, Ships a Sailing, Kerry, Geehan's, Shaskeen,
           Sligo Maid, Green Mountain, Christmas Eve, Bank of Ireland
           Wise Maid..
 
     Jigs: Kesh, Gold Ring, Lark in the Morning, Saddle the Pony, Whelan's..
 
Slip Jigs: Dingle Regatta, Denis Murphy's, Quaker's Wife, The Butterfly..
 
   Polkas: BallyDesmond 1 & 2, Grand Old Dame, Spanish Lady
 
Hornpipes: Kitty's Wedding, Home Ruler, Derry Hornpipe, Rights of Man,
           Harvest Home, Off to California, Boys of BlueHill, Fisher's..
 
In the Boston seisiun (Green Dragon) I play with some well accomplished
players and they hardly ever mention the tune name..  the North Shore
crowd includes some good musicians also, but it always a learning
seisiun where we play jigs, reels, hornpipes, polkas and always
trading/learning new tunes.. in Boston it is mostly reels but last
Saturday we had a jig fest because a fiddler replaced an accordion
player who was home in Ireland.
                                   Seamus Keleher