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>
>Yes, I want to understand and practice the religion of
>my ancestors.  Yes, experiential workings are very
>different than dry scholarship devoid of experience.
>But if the experiential framework is based on nothing
>more than ex cathedra pronouncements from your own
>internal map, it is very hard to claim that they are somehow
>related to the practices of our ancestors.
>
>Rowan Fairgrove
>
 
  My sentiments exactly.  Too many people are projecting their own
fantasies into truth.  If they were all right, the Celts practiced
about every ritual you can imagine.
  If people simply want to say "I like these motifs, I think the
Celts had good style", or "I like this Celtic archetype", or "This
bit of Celtic symbolism fits in nicely with my system", that's
fine, but lots of people claim that their mishmash and interpretations
are "right".
  But the Celts were distributed through time and space, so while
there will be characteristics and tendencies of Celtic practice/belief,
there will likely be local evolutions and innovations too...  and
the druids are likely to have slightly different understandings and
thoughts on things than the common folk, just as regular Christians
have a different working understanding of Christianity than their
local minister/priest/etc.
  Sorry for the ramble -- the idea is that it's tough to know or
formulate anything precisely in this subject...
 
  mn