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In continuation of the Pictish dilemma:
 
>   Ah, a delightful topic, the Picts... there is a group based in
> Edinburgh, the Pictish Arts Society, that I mentioned a couple of weeks
> ago trhat has regular lectures, a quarterly publication and an annual
> conference (Nov 28) on this topic...
 
Kaledon Naddair has produced one of his interesting  monographs on
Pictish Art - I'll  try to send in its title and maybe the Table of Contents ...
If anyone here attends this conference, please post any information -
and please, notify the Conference organizers about our Celtic-L, awaiting
their input ... !!!
 
>   Basically, the consensus is typically that the Picts are Celtic with
> some proto-Celtic and possibly non-IE elements in them.  Remember that the
> definitive litmus test of Celticness is language, and we have plenty of
> evidence of Celtic language amongst Picts, as well as Celtic artistic and
> ethnic elements.
 
I have understood it that the Picts are part of the Polar spread of Ural-
Altaic shamanic peoples ...
 
> >   I think the Picts inheritance was through your Mother while
> >the Scots was through your Father (I don't know the technical term).
> >The two peoples integrated with one marriage which joined both lines
> >and this marriage was performed on some stone which was brought from
> >somewhere in the North of Ireland (i.e. where the Scots came from).
 
Scots law gave women the right of land-ownership, at least. I'm not sure
about inheritance laws, but I think they favoured the male while permittng
the female in the direct line to inherit, in the absense of male direct
descent, whereas I believe Anglo-Saxon (or was it Norman) law excluded
female inheritance and moved to the next line of male descent ...
 
 >I think this stone is now used by the English Monarchy.
 
Do you mean 'The Stone of Scone", now in Westminster Abbey, and
used as the Throne Chair of the British monarchical Coronations ...
 
>   If you want to be technical, "Scots" came from Ireland.  The term "Scot"
> meant someone from Ireland, since it was itself called "Scotia".
 
In this regard, I have often wondered about the name of my "Scots"
ancestors - Erskine.  I presume this name is a contraction of Erse-kin -
ie. a group of familiarly-related Erse-speaking peoples (probably
as seen through the eyes of neighbors who were not Erse-speakers - maybe
Picts?)  They are recorded as having settled in the area of Renfrew,
in Renfrewshire (near Glasgow) by the 12th Century, possibly MUCH
earlier ... Renfrew is now part of the princely appurtenances
of the Prince of Wales (Duke of Cornwall, Baron Renfrew, and
linked to Carrick, which was part of the Irish royal lineage).
No doubt these early Scotian migrants were Erse-speaking.
 
>   The matrilineal practice of the Picts is generally accepted though there
> is a little debate about it.
 
>   Are you talking about the King's Stone in Dunadd?  Or are you talking
> about
> the theory that Pictish symbol stones might be representing marriage
> alliance, a la Anthony Jackson's theory?
>
> >  Does anybody have more information about any of this?
 
There is a recent publication, of which the title currently eludes me,
but runs something along the lines of:
 
_The problem of the Picts resolved_. Can anyone cite it for me, please?
 
Best,
Melcir