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https://www.amusingplanet.com/2016/05/corlea-trackway-2000-year-old-wooden.html

On Thu, Nov 22, 2018 at 1:26 PM Richard Marsh <
[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> Again by memory from Barry Raftery's talk: bogs were "paved" by light
> planks
> of locally sourced wood, which would sort of float well enough to bear the
> relatively light chariots. I don't know how heavily laden carts would
> fare.
> For the unfinished 2nd-century Corlea Trackway in County Longford, which
> Raftery excavated, the workers ignorantly used thick oak planks, which
> sank.
>
> I asked Raftery and folklorist Dáithí Ó hÓgáin if that was the road built
> by
> Midir to settle a fidchell win by King Eochaid in the Midir and Étaín
> tale,
> and both said they were about 80% sure it was. The story says that
> Eochaid's
> people spied on the building of the road against Midir's express wishes,
> and
> that's why he didn't finish the road. The road in the story seems to be
> located exactly where the Corlea Trackway is. As a humble storyteller with
> no academic reputation at risk, I'm 100% sure they're the same.
>
> Richard Marsh
> Dublin
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Charles Simmonds
> Sent: Thursday, November 22, 2018 6:39 PM
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Subject: Re: [OLD-IRISH-L] Welsh Chariot Burial
>
> apologies for repeating this question, but last time no-one could give a
> satisfactory answer
>
> I often wonder how could chariots be effectively used in the conditions
> that obtained in Iron Age Ireland or Britain? (absence of roads and
> bridges, woods, boggy land)...it must have been something of a
> logistical challenge even to get your chariot from A to B, even it was
> relatively light because it was made of wickerwork; furthermore, the
> horse collar and harness did not come into widespread use in Europe
> until the 12th century, so presumably the horses drew the chariot with a
> kind of yoke, which is not very efficient
>
> perhaps battles involving chariots took place on specially prepared
> fields, a bit like "away matches" on football pitches?
>
> CS
>
>
> Am 22.11.2018 um 19:07 schrieb Máire Nig Ualghairg:
> > The chariot may deteriorate quickly but the metal work you would
> > expect in a chariot burial would be expected to survive. This one is
> > the first that has been found in this area and it is, if I remember
> > correctly, a custom normally associated with the Parisi in Yorkshire
> > (and, coincidentally with the Parisi in the area around what is now
> > Paris). This has been found in Pembrokeshire which is quite a distance
> > away from the Parisi and would have been in the territory of the
> > Demetae (Dyfed) - it's all very exciting and I would love to know
> > where they have found it but, naturally, they aren't releasing the
> > exact location.
> >
> > Máire
> > On Thu, 22 Nov 2018 at 18:00, Richard Marsh
> > <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >> By memory from a talk by the late wetlands specialist archaeologist
> Barry
> >> Raftery: remains of roads designed for chariot traffic have been found
> in
> >> Ireland. Also bits for chariot horses. He said he knew they were for
> >> pairs
> >> of chariot horses because only one side was decorated, as only one side
> >> would be seen. Irish chariots were made of wicker, which quickly
> >> dissolved
> >> in soil, so none have been found. I don't know what he may have
> published
> >> on
> >> the subject.
> >>
> >> Richard Marsh
> >> Dublin
> >>
> >> -----Original Message-----
> >> From: Tom Smith
> >> Sent: Thursday, November 22, 2018 12:51 PM
> >> To: [log in to unmask]
> >> Subject: [OLD-IRISH-L] Welsh Chariot Burial
> >>
> >> This was found in Pembrokeshire, which is very close to Wexford. Why
> have
> >> none been found in Ireland?
> https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-46294000=
> >>
> >>
> >> ---
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