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Do you mean that phrasing it that way indicates the act of going amongst 
the dead, becoming one of them, David? That would explain a lot, since, 
when writing "dul in éag" today, many would feel inclined to say/write 
"dul in éaga", which is sometimes less effort to avoid than to try to 
explain.
mg


Scríobh 17/01/2012 09:14, David Stifter:
> On 16 Jan 2012 at 7:32, Dennis King wrote:
>
>>> Is and atbath Fergus iar tain hi crích Connacht iar
>>> n-écaib a mná .i. iar tíchtain dó do fis scel co Ailill&  Meidb.
>> *NB: For whatever reason, OI puts "éc = death" in the plural in some
>> idioms, i.e. "téit do écaib = he goes to deaths = he dies".
> This is - at least - an Insular Celtic thing, but it probably goes
> back to much older times. In Bret. "ankou", Corn. "ancow" and W
> "angeu", all "death", we have formally u-stem plurals continuing PC
> *ankou̯es<  PIE *n̥k̑eu̯es, the plural of the u-stem noun *nek̑u-
> "dead person, corpse". So the "ecáe" to whom he goes are really "the
> dead".
>
> David
>


-- 
Marion Gunn * eGteo (Estab.1991)
27 Páirc an Fhéithlinn, Baile an
Bhóthair, An Charraig Dhubh,
Co. Átha Cliath, Éire/Ireland.
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