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It seems that the early unadorned sans faces were regarded as a novelty
instead of a futurist thing.  Only at the turn of the century, plain
geometric were considered modern.  Grotesque is a traditional name for sans,
but Egyptian?  Today egyptians are triangular serif faces.  Futura is a cool
name, but this was smack inside the 20th century.
________________________________
Paulo Caparica Junior


On Thu, May 5, 2011 at 2:55 PM, Michael Brady <[log in to unmask]>wrote:

> On May 5, 2011, at 1:33 PM, Guza, Jacob wrote:
>
> > I don't agree. Each age has it's own concept of "futuristic." At least
> recently it has (in the later decades of the 20th century). A font from 1940
> won't look like a 19th century future, it'll just look like the 1940s.
>
> To the well-versed typophile or other fan of type, maybe so. But to most
> people, DeVinne Ornamented is outre and Futura is, well, futuristic. Of
> course, many people still think of Impressionist paintings as
> modernist-traditional and Abstract Expressionist paintings are pretty much
> le dernier cri. For Paulo's 19th century person, the futuristic type might
> have been the new, uncommo sans serifs that were just beginning to appear.
> Caslon produced "Egyptian," the first sans face in England in 1816 and
> Thorowgood introduced "Grotesque" in 1832.
>
> A sampling of other sans: Akzidenz-Grotesk was released in 1898; Franklin
> Gothic in 1902; News Gothic in 1908; Gill Sans and Monotype Grotesque in
> 1926; Kabel, Futura, and Neuzeit S in 1927; etc.
>
>
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> Michael Brady
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>