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For what it's worth, Ainmneacha Plandaí agus Ainmhithe gives "luachair 
bhláthéar" with the English translation "sharp-flowered rush". Nettles, 
thistles and ferns are found growing together above ground at the same 
time of year. Can't speak for rushes, only to say that they are 
flourishing right now (too early for nettles and thistles), hence we 
make Brigid's Crosses this time of year (beginning of February). Ferns 
still seem the better bet, on those grounds.
mg

Scríobh Andy M:
> Currudan c635-064 Equisetaceae Horse-tail, Mare's-tail   Cauda Equina 
> .i. an curraidin  Gàidhlig clois,
> Equisetium hyemale L.? scouring rush, snakegrass, dock, candock, 
> Dutch-rush
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equisetum
> http://www.habitas.org.uk/flora/index.html
> Lagore-Loch da Gabhar-Rath Gabhair
> Was  Maélodrán a : Hiemalis/Hibernus-Hymenaeus
> Himas (sanscr)  snow   job
>
> Andy
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Charles DeVane" 
> <[log in to unmask]>
> To: <[log in to unmask]>
> Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2010 1:49 PM
> Subject: Re: [OLD-IRISH-L] athrathai luaid
>
>
> It seems to be some form of bracken or fern (rath) with "ath" meaning 
> "another" and "luaid" having something to do with "quickness" or with 
> "moving."
>
> I'd have to look further to go beyond these initial impressions. 
> Evidently, it must sting or burn somehow but here again I am just 
> using imbas.:-) If I were close to a university library, I'd look 
> further but right now I'm mired in 2 feet of snow.
>
>
>
> Searles O'Dubhain
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Dennis King" <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: Saturday, February 6, 2010 12:41:49 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada 
> Eastern emale
> Subject: [OLD-IRISH-L] athrathai luaid
>
> A few years ago I posted an excerpt from one of the tales about Máel
> Odrán here:
>
> https://listserv.heanet.ie/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0611&L=OLD-IRISH-L&P=587
>
> The hero gives Diarmait three tufts (which normally ought to be grass)
> to wipe his butt with. They turn out to be tufts of green nettle, of
> thistle, and of a third unidentified plant called (in the dative)
> "athrathai luaid". I recently posted this text to my blog along with
> a Modern Irish translation and a photo of the mystery term from the MS:
>
> http://nimill.blogspot.com/2010/02/paipear-leithris.html
>
> If anyone can figure out what "athrathai luaid" is, I'd love to hear.
>
> Dennis
>
>