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Thanks very much David for that reference, 
 
Hamp (Eriú 1988 p 194) suggests that feamain (seaweed) may not be a derivative of feam but the two may be etymologically distinct having undergone 'formal contamination through phonetic convergence and semantic feature overlap.' Does your etymology applies to both?
 
Durachdan,
 
Peadar

--- On Wed, 4/3/09, David Stifter <[log in to unmask]> wrote:


From: David Stifter <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Re: [OLD-IRISH-L] feam/femm - seaweed etc
To: [log in to unmask]
Date: Wednesday, 4 March, 2009, 2:28 PM


This is not directly in answer of your question, but I have written a note
on the etymology of the word in footnote 6 of:

David Stifter, "Study in Red", Die Sprache 40/2 (1998), 202-223.

David


On Mi, 4.03.2009, 12:27, Peadar wrote:
> A chairde,
>  
> have any of you ever come across the term given by DIL as femm (also feam)
> as meaning a sort of sea-weed, with another meaning?
>  
> The word appears in later literature in both Ireland and Sotland meaning
> penis. Any thoughts as to earlier examples of this?
>  
> Durachdan,
>  
> Peadar
>
>
>
>
>