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David Stifter wrote:
> Neil McLeod wrote:
> 
>>>> Do-gní in liaig a leges & osclaicid na crêchta & do-bertar baicc
>>>> taris et dergthair coltur iar sain i tenid et do-be[i]r in liaig
>>>> ammus de for broind ind f*ir. Co tânic in días êorna & in duirb mét
>>>> lochad & in gaî & cech a mbaí and archena.
>> Absolutely. The 'stagecraft' is is emphasised somewhat by the word
>> 'ammus', which means not just an 'attack', but an 'attempted attack'
>> (one not necessarily succeeding); so in this case a 'feigned attack'.
>> (Cf the translation at DIL A 309.54).
>>
>> Note that a coulter is note the ploughshare itself, but rather a finer
>> blade which cuts the soil just ahead of the ploughshare.
> 
> Why stagecraft? If the coulter is the cutting part of the 
> ploughshare, the doctor could use it to cut the skin open and to 
> release the unwanted objects.

Because he has already cut the skin open (osclaicid na crêchta), and 
applied the hooks, before he heats the coulter. And he makes an attack 
on Tadg's stomach, rather than specifically on one of the wounds.

On the other hand, a heated coulter might well be a suitably sterile and 
cauterising instrument for removing embedded foreign objects in a wound. 
But Fingin is a wizard-doctor of the highest order; I think he was in 
control of the situation.

Neil