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I just received my copy of the new book on Ireland's traditional boats (Traditional Boats of Ireland: History, Folklore, And Construction, by Criostoir MacCarthaigh), which we mentioned here sometime past.  Well, it's a big, beautiful book, weighs about 27 pounds. I have skimmed through it and find the price tag worth it.  It surveys a variety of wooden craft and their antecedents, and mentions a little about construction. The construction details are slightly less well developed for the true boat fancier, but they are good enough.  
My only complaint, if complaint it be, is that the mention of the word "folklore" in the title of the book should be termed "folklore-lite."  Yes, folklore is mentioned, in snippets. Sometimes we see a paragraph quotation from the IFC's archives, always welcome. I suppose that added together you could say there is a decent amount of folklore material in the 500+ pages, but nothing really sustained or pulled together. Even so, it is more folklore than one usually gets in books about traditional boats.
Apropos to our discussion of the deeper antiquity of wooden boats in Ireland, there is almost nothing, though I emphasize I have so far only skimmed the book. 
I also received a book about Ireland's maritime archaeology (the title escapes me at the moment; it is the one offered on sale recently from David Brown Books, from whom I get most of my bargain medieval/antiquity books, including one just arrived yesterday on new approaches to the archaeology of the Scottish Neolithic monuments -- anyone read that yet?).  It covers the boating tradition slightly but is more of a general archaeology of the coast. Good book. -- Wade