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>>type). But in number-heavy text (mathematical, scientific, analytical,
>>or a discipline with lots of serialized numbers, such as legal
>>references), lining figures will probably serve better.
>
>Sometimes the term "lining figures" is used to mean non-hanging. I
>thought its origin was monospacing--lining vertically rather than
>horizontally. Is this like so many typographic terms where there is no
>universally-accepted definition for terminology (a la widow and
>orphan)?



=Tabular= figures might be oldstyle/free-range  ;-)
or modern lining/ranging. Numeral one sets as wide as 8.
This, as opposed to =Proportional= old style/f-r or modern lining.
Each numeral sets to its own width.

--
Gary Munch
<http://www.munchfonts.com>