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At 9:42 Uhr -0800 09.11.2003, Gunnar Swanson wrote:
>On Nov 9, 2003, at 9:12 AM, Rolf F. Rehe wrote:
>>At 18:16 Uhr -0500 08.11.2003, Gary Munch wrote:
>>>before, in manuscripts. Most important sections (grafs) would be
>>>marked off with a large Versal letter, usually ornamental. The
>>The artist lacking the time to draw in the ornamental initial - would
>>that not be the rare exception? And marking off a paragraph - albeit
>>only a selective one, not each one - with a large initial, isn't that
>>a practice still in much use? Am I misunderstanding your remarks,
>
>I thought that the paragraph indent came from leaving space for a
>pilcrow. I believe that early printers used rubricators rather than
>printing the same sheet again in red, eliminating the need to deal deal
>with registration problems and making their goods closer to the ideal
>of a hand-lettered book. Whether the insight that the paragraphs were
>evident sans pilcrows was based on deadlines, frugality, or a
>generalized search for elegant method I couldn't guess.
>
>Gunnar

That's an interesting theory about the origin of the indent. As far
as I know, in pre-Gutenberg books there were no indents, only two
kinds of large initials: the illuminated one and the one that was
simply a letter three times or so the size of the text type. I found
it interesting too that the type sizes in early printed Bibles varied
greatly from about 24 point (or even larger) to about 10 point or so.
-Rolf
Rolf F. Rehe
Design Research International
- Quality and Innovation -