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  First, pepd is not even a nickname, you can call me
 Cristobal, or Cristobo.
   I know you want to be disturbing, and I know it is
 good to have someone close to remind us all that we
 must not accept anything as granted. But there is a
limit: You can`t use "common sense" as a tool to prove
that Celts were Martians, but neither you can`t say
that "there is no proof that Lugh Lambfadha and Lugus
are the same one". Well, if you have to prove
something like that beyond any doubt, when researching
ancient history, you will be in trouble. What would it
be a proof, then? Along that way, investigation
becomes eventually a futile effort. If we can`t know
anything, then just read epic Irish books as (very
good) literature, and stop wasting money to dig up
useless engraved stones, or statues of a man who bears
a wheel (I thought that was the same that depicted in
the Gundestrup cauldron, but of course I may be
wrong).
 There are some facts that we all, Celtic-maniacs,
assume when approach this sort of things: first,
Western Europe is just a small region. If a belief was
accepted in Gaul, then very probably it was also
common in the Isles, and Bohemia (or Hungary, or
whatever they called it). We know, through placenames,
and personal names, and ethnic names, that people
living all that area were mainly the same.
. Second, it is (relatively) acceptable using sources
from, say, engraved stones and the Book of Invasions
simultaneously, because beliefs can survive for
centuries with minor changes. Popular religion in wide
areas of Europe was still pre-christian not long ago.
 It makes no sense, to me, comparing our generally
accepted ideas about, for instance, identifying
Gaulish "Mars" with Lugus, and the theories about the
celts developed along the 19th century. No one here is
defending "volkgeist", as an explanation for anything.
And we have all given up tracking old migrations and
the spread of Celts, as they used to do. All what we
want, now, it is to make an acceptably reliable
picture of celtic Pantheon of gods and godesses.
  Before you ask me "How can you be sure that popular
religion was non-Christian?" let me tell you one
notice about Galicia: people who lived by the river
Tamega, used to slay a chicken when there were floods,
in order to get the river calm again.
 Another common practice: casting the statue of the
local saint to the river, when droughts. Or diping it
in the sea (this one is an Asturian usage) asking for
a fruitful fish.
 See what I mean? Even after 2000 years of Christian
influence!



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