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Thanks for the info, Ray and Amy.  I appreciate it.  I began in on that piece
at Angelfire.com, but hadn't finished it, when I wrote my post.  I will give
it due attention.  Apologies, Ray: by the "other side" (re my PBE and Cahill
reference) I meant, er,  "the extreme other side"--that is, the folks who
passionately believe that everything good about Western civ is Celtic in
origin if you only look hard enough (and everything bad is somebody else).
(Please, folks; I'm teasing.  I sometimes find PBE's fervent views
refreshing, even if I don't quite believe them--and I think the world
sometimes needs apologists for Celtic culture . . . just not, dare one hope,
uncritical ones who ignore solid archeological, historical, or scientific
evidence in the name of patriotism/nationalism).

Someone recently made a comment on the list about Celtic festivals ("Highland
games," Irish fests, etc.) perhaps having an element of white
supremacy/racism about them (for only a few festivalgoers, I hope).  Speak of
the devil: A few weeks ago I attended one of the U. S.'s larger such
festivals, the Bethlehem Celtic Classic in Bethlehem, PA (a stone's throw
from where I live).  The friend I was with pointed out a small group of
"skinheads" with White Supremacist tattoos, and was puzzled about why they
had congregated at this festival.  I had never even considered it, but I
said, "Well, the Celts are white, aren't they?  Do you see any
African-Americans here?"   We looked around at the throngs of thousands, and
were disquieted to find only one couple.   Now, I am sure that many
dark-skinned Americans have some Celtic ancestors, but they chose to stay
away from these festivities, even though genetically they might have been
more "Celtic" than many of the festivalgoers.  Has anyone on the list noted
any recent literature or mentions in the media of so-called "white pride"
links with Celtic festivals in America (or elsewhere)?  I would be interested
(and disturbed) to know if that is the case.   (Perhaps I am just terribly
naive, and this sort of thing is a commonplace, but I hope not.)

Hywl,
Carrie A. Prettiman