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> I was talking with an acquaintance the other night whose son has taken a
> lot of flack for playing the flute, a "feminine" instrument. And drums are
> often regarded as "masculine". But, time was (and still is in some
> cultures) when only men were allowed to play flutes and only women play drums.
>

Another simple example - our dear old archetypal Sun and Moon whose deities
(and linguistic genders) are respectively masculine and feminine in some
cultures and the reverse in other cultures (Shintoist Japan, our ancestors
the Gauls or was it the Germans, etc.) And while we're there, the masculine
bull is the symbol for the very feminine zodiacal sign Taurus and the
reputedly swaying, curvaceous, gentle and feminine sign Libra is amongst the
masculine ones.

Looks like getting to the core of archetypes is reaching a zone where gender
is no longer very important. Which makes it really difficult to decide what
is essentially masculine and feminine. Personally I have never tried very
hard.