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Subject: Re: an interesting thing about those Inuit soapstone sculptures
From: Randal <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Discussion of Type and Typographic Design <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Sun, 30 Apr 2000 23:38:08 -0400
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At 8:06 PM -0400 4/30/00, Ron Koster wrote:
>That is so totally not the point I was making...

A couple points:

1. Hyperbolic charges of racism are not useful.

2. Kate's original posting was about the effects of media on culture.

3. That is a much more interesting topic to me than arguing about whether
someone is unconciously racist or not.


I was reading recently about the origins of the Grimm's fairy tales. The
story of Little Red Riding hood was originally included in their collection
as a traditional German folk tale. They got the story from a well-to-do
aquaintance of their's who had heard it from her illiterate nanny. The only
problem was that the nanny (who I believe spoke both German and French) had
apparently heard it from someone who had read the Charles Perrault story
(written over a century before).

The most interesting questions raised by this are:

Just what is "Tradition" and "Traditional Culture?"

What is the value of tradition versus innovation.

Just what is useful about seeking unsullied "authentic" sources for culture?

Hrant is always going on about the "essential" nature of letters. Is there
any essential nature to culture?


I recently had conversations with a letterpress printer who was audibly
distressed when I brought up the possibility of shooting polymer plates. He
also was quick to emphasize that I couldn't email any art to him for
quotes, as he didn't have a computer (he did have a fax, though).

Why is it so axiomatic in our culture that we should look for authenticity
in the old?

I'm sure there a whole host of other, more insightful questions to be found
in this topic...


-- Randal

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