LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for CELTIC-L Archives


CELTIC-L Archives

CELTIC-L Archives


CELTIC-L@LISTSERV.HEANET.IE


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CELTIC-L Home

CELTIC-L Home

CELTIC-L  December 1998

CELTIC-L December 1998

Subject:

Celtic Social Structures - a short summary Part 2

From:

"Mag.phil. Raimund Karl" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Mag.phil. Raimund Karl

Date:

Wed, 9 Dec 1998 07:16:18 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (127 lines)

As promised, here's the next part of my Celtic Social Structures paper.
I hope you enjoy it.

The same rules that I gave for the treatment of Celtic Religion and Law
are also in place here: You may distribute this message freely as long
as it is not used for commercial purposes and you include my email
adress <[log in to unmask]>.

This message is part of a series that has been and will be published on
the Celtic Culture mailing list <[log in to unmask]>. The
titles of the series which already exist are:
Celtic Religion - what information do we really have (7 part message,
also available as a single .txt file)
Celtic Law - a short summary (12  part message, also available as a
single .txt file)
Celtic Social Structures - a short summary (this message)
The messages are also available on the WorldWideWeb at the Celtic-L
Resources page at <http://unet.univie.ac.at/~a8700035/celtrese.html>.

RAY
________________________________________________________________________

Celtic Social Structures - a short summary part 2

2. Definitions

Before we really turn onto the matter it is necessary to clearly define
the limitations of this paper, and to explain a few terms which will be
frequently used later during the text.

2.1. Time and Area covered in this paper

Of course, Cultures which think of themselves as being Celtic still
exist today. However, those modern societies have, of course, almost no
similarity, at least in regard to the social system, to the societies
formed by the ancient Celts. As I am trying to show a „common Celtic"
social system, I first have to define what I mean with this.
What I think of as being the „common Celtic" social system exists in the
first millenium BC (approximatly) in the Celtic settled areas of
continental Europe and the British Isles. With the end of Celtic
independence on the continent it ends there, but lives on in the British
Isles, outside the areas conquered by the Romans. After the end of the
roman occupation it even returns to some of the areas that had been
controlled by Rome, for instance to Wales, Cornwall and Brittany,
basically to those areas which even today are called the „Celtic
countries". There this system lives on until the end of Celtic
independence in those areas, even though, in some areas, heavily
modified by outside influences.

2.2. Models of Social Structures

Basically I think that most of the sociological analyses existing are
probably quite interesting to comparative sociologists and maybe
archaeological culture classifiers (such persons that like to group
different cultures together because of similarities in their basic
system). They are, however, at least in my humble opinion, not a useful
description of the Celtic Social system itself, as those models neither
explain the exact functioning of the system, nor are the base systems
that currently are most often used detailed enough to allow any
interpretation of specific sociological elements from them.
Currently most frequently used, especially in the English speaking
scholarly community, are the evolutionary sociological models which
assume a general social evolution of mankind from Bands over tribes and
chiefdoms to states, and the Celtic Society is usually classified as
being somewhere in the area of turning from chiefdom to state (see for
this Arnold and Blair 1995). While this classification definitly is of a
certain value, I doubt that such models help us much for really
understanding Celtic Social Structures. Also, the general approach has
lately been questioned (see for this Yoffee and Sherrat 1993).
Other models in use, especially in the German speaking scholarly
community, are such that use a basic „feudal" system, in ist basic
makeup not unlike what would be calssified as a complex chiefdom in the
above system, to describe the social makeup of society (see for this
Kimmig 1969), or describe the political organisation and think this to
be a valid description of the social system (see for this Dobesch 1996).
While, again, those approaches definitly have a certain validity, they
are also not useful when trying to understand how the Celtic social
system worked.
As such, while plenty of models exist, I do not think they are of great
use when trying to reconstruct Celtic Social Structures in a way that
not only describes surface symptoms, but tries to explain how this
system worked.

2.3. Specific sociological Terms regarding Celtic Social Structures

When dealing with Celtic Social Structures, a few terms will frequently
be used, that do not belong to the common sociological vocabulary, but
which are of central importance in the Celtic system. Therefore, I will
try to list them up here and give a short explanation as to their
meaning-
céili (chéile) = client, person that gets a rent of a lord and has to
fulfill certain duties in return
dóer = unfree, base
fine = family, kin-group
cennfine = head of kin (usually the eldest male in the kin, but may
vary)
derbfine = kin-group to the fourth generation (i.e. the
great-grandfather)
máithre = maternal kin
Nemed = „sacred", sociological term used to describe people which are of
sepcial social status, which gives some privileges. It could also
loosely be translated with „noble".
sóer = free
________________________________________________________________________
Ok, that's it for now. In the next message we will take a look at family
and kindred, one of the base elements of Celtic Social Structures.

RAY
________________________________________________________________________
To be continued ...
________________________________________________________________________

RAY - Mag.phil. Raimund KARL
Universität Wien, Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte
A-1190 Wien, Franz Klein Gasse 1
E-Mail: <[log in to unmask]>
Internet: <http://unet.univie.ac.at/˜a8700035>
________________________________________________________________________

Visit the Celtic-L Resources Page at
<http://unet.univie.ac.at/˜a8700035/celtrese.html>
________________________________________________________________________

Privat: A-1120 Wien, Hasenhutgasse 7-11/9/4
Tel/AB/Fax: (+43 1) 8103629 oder mobil: (+43 676) 3048830
________________________________________________________________________

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

January 2019
December 2018
September 2018
March 2018
January 2018
December 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
November 2016
August 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
March 2015
February 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
August 2014
June 2014
May 2014
February 2014
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995
April 1995
March 1995
February 1995
January 1995
December 1994
November 1994
October 1994
September 1994
August 1994
July 1994
June 1994
May 1994
April 1994
March 1994
February 1994
January 1994
December 1993
November 1993
October 1993
September 1993
August 1993
July 1993
June 1993
May 1993
April 1993
March 1993
February 1993
January 1993
December 1992
November 1992
October 1992
September 1992
August 1992
July 1992
June 1992
May 1992
April 1992
March 1992
February 1992
January 1992
December 1991
November 1991
October 1991
September 1991
August 1991
July 1991
June 1991
May 1991

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.HEANET.IE

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager