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CELTIC-L  September 1998

CELTIC-L September 1998

Subject:

Re: Quest for Lost Civilisation

From:

Sharon Evans <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Wed, 30 Sep 1998 08:58:50 +0100

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (33 lines)

>This man didn't say that the Egyptians hadn't built the pyramids and that
>they were built by "more advanced" civilizations from somewhere else, but
>rather that the pyramids, because they aligned with the stars as they were
>at an earlier date, were probably built on sites that were sacred to some
>sort of culture that he suggested may have been worldwide.  Just like
>churches were built on sites that were sacred to the Celts.  So if that was
>the same show, there was no idea that "some super-advanced civilization
>must have come along and taught the people how to create there various
>wonders, for as we all know, ancient man was utterly incapable of learning
>or innovating on his own".

I'm sorry, perhaps it was a different programme - the suggestion was that the
Egyptians had been taught their mathematical and astronomical skills by an
unidentified group of visitors (not extra terrestrial, note), who also visited the aztecs and
nazcans in south america and the buddhists (or their precursors) in Tibet.  This tenuous conclusion was reached because the three sites all happened to line up with particular
constellations (Leo, Orion, Dracha(sp?) and another) only in the year 10500BC.
He also mentioned that the calculations of the lengths of days, years etc used
today are not as accurate as those that were used in the construction of the sites, so how is it possible to extrapolate back using modern day calculations and come up with this common figure of 10500?  Surely there is a margin of error that would mean that the
sites could have been constructed within a couple of millennia of each other, but not
close enough together to have been linked.

Personally I think it's all a big coincidence and his approach was incredibly
deterministic.  If you look hard enough for something then you generally find it,
not because it's actually there but because you make everything else fit around
the idea that you've got (which is also, incidentally, a fault in quite a lot of archaeological
investigations).  As I said to someone else, he might like to come and investigate
a couple of bills I received a few months ago, both for identical amounts but from unrelated companies (one gas, one credit card)...spooky.  Perhaps there's some conspiracy going on behind my back.

Anyway, apologies for the off-topic discussion, I can see this sort of debate getting
quite heated if it's allowed to!

Sharon

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