LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for AFRIK-IT Archives


AFRIK-IT Archives

AFRIK-IT Archives


AFRIK-IT@LISTSERV.HEANET.IE


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

AFRIK-IT Home

AFRIK-IT Home

AFRIK-IT  July 1998

AFRIK-IT July 1998

Subject:

Secondary POPs, Australia, Benin and Mississippi

From:

Jeff Cochrane <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Wed, 8 Jul 1998 11:47:59 -5

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (162 lines)

Greetings Afrik-ITes!

Below is the latest update of the list of secondary towns/cities in
Africa with physical points of presence (POPs) of computers providing
public access to the Internet.  One may assume that these
POPs provide PPP access unless otherwise specified.  Corrections,
comments appreciated.

Thanks to all who contributed!  Again, unless you tell me otherwise,
I will attribute your contribution by name in the final paper.  No
one has yet asked to remain anonymous.

I've also added a list of candidates for a "Compact" country list
for places where geography suggests to me that a secondary POP may
not be a critical issue. Suggestions for exclusion from or inclusion
in this list are welcome.

Interest in this area is roughly comparable to that exhibited at the
following site in Australia:

http://www.ipac.gov.au/report/part3.htm#ATTACHMENT C

which states

> Local Call Access

> A key issue in the development of the market for Internet services
> in regional and rural is the need to extend the range of untimed
> local call access to the Internet for end-users. This is achieved
> by establishing a physical point of presence (POP, essentially a
> connection from the access network into the Internet) in a local
> call zone, or by providing a local call 13 number facility to
> end-users and the ISP then being billed for the cost of end-user
> connection to its nearest POP.

Note the distinction between local-call access versus physical POP.
The full report begins at

http://www.ipac.gov.au/report/ipac.htm

Thus the issue of rural access is of interest in Australia.
Indeed, it is of interest in the USA.

For example, a member of my family lives in a small (2000
population) town in Northeastern Mississippi, which is a state in
the Southeastern part of the USA that is roughly the size and shape
of Benin.  Benin is a bit smaller geographically, but has 5.4
million people, almost 3 million more people than Mississippi.  Per
capital annual income is reportedly $420 in Benin, $15,800 in
Mississippi, though I always find such figures in Africa to be
suspiciously low.

Both have major cities on their coasts, though Benin's coastal
concentration is much larger.  Mississippi has an interior
industrial city that is larger than its two coastal ones combined,
and has no city as large in population as Cotonou.  My family lives
in a somewhat remote corner of the state, in the town of West Point.

To access the nearest physical POP in Starkeville or Columbus, my
family must connect via telephone over a distance of about 40
kilometers at a cost of about US$ 7 per hour for line charges, and
then pay an additional fee to the ISP of approximately US$ 20 per
month for unlimited PPP access. Alternatively, they could pay an
additional $8 per month to the telephone line provider for extended
"local" calling service, and thereby eliminate the time-metered line
charge.  Thus "local" access to a physical POP is effectively
available to her at $28 per month.  The quality of the access is
excellent, with 2400 bytes per second throughput observed on FTP
downloads.

Spotty reports reaching me from Benin suggest the principal problem
where telephone access is available is the quality of the local
telephone exchange equipment.  Businesses in the same town but on
different exchanges may report drastically different qualities of
access to POPs in Cotonou.

I do not know what the line charges are to Cotonou from remote towns
in Benin.  However I can confirm that PPP connections are feasible to
the following research stations of INRAB: POBE, NIAOULI, BOHICON,
N'DALI, and SAVE.  I see a high fee charged by the local ISP in
Cotonou to send its technician to these places, and therefore assume
they are far from Cotonou.  I regret I have not yet had the pleasure
of travel to these places myself.

Cheers!
Jeff @ Washington



GEOGRAPHIC PHYSICAL DISPERSION OF POINTS OF PRESENCE (POPS)
ALPHABETICAL BY ISO 3166 COUNTRY ABBREVIATION
DRAFT July 8, 1998


COUNTRIES WITH SECONDARY POPs
(First city is listed in parentheses)
[Sources are listed in brackets]

AO Angola: (Luanda), Cabinda [MJ], Benguela [MJ]

BW Botswana: (Gaborone), Maun [MJ], Francistown [MJ]

CI Côte d'Ivoire: (Abidjan), Bouake* [KT], San Pedro* [KT]

CM Cameroon: (Yaounde), Douala (reported not in operation 7/98) [MJ]

GH Ghana: (Accra), Tamale [NQ, MJ], Kumasi [JC]

GN Guinea: (Conakry), Labe* [HC], Kankan* [HC], Nzerekore* [HC]

KE Kenya: (Nairobi), Mombasa [MJ], Eldoret [MJ], Nakuru [MJ], Kisumu
[MJ]

MZ Mozambique: (Maputo), Beira [MJ]

NA Namibia: (Windhoek), Swakopmund [MJ], Walvis Bay [MJ]

SZ Swaziland: (Mbabane), Manzini [CG]

TZ Tanzania: (Dar es Salaam), Arusha [MJ]

ZA South Africa: (Johannesburg), elsewhere too many to list here

ZM Zambia: (Lusaka), Kitwe [TH], Livingstone* [TH]

ZW Zimbabwe: (Harare), Bulawayo [AR]

*Planned


GEOGRAPHICALLY COMPACT COUNTRIES WHERE A PRINCIPAL CITY
MAY REASONABLY PROVIDE NATIONWIDE ACCESS

BI Burundi

DJ Djibouti

GW Guinea Bissau

KM Comoros

LS Lesotho

MU Mauritius

RE Réunion

RW Rwanda

SC Seychelles

SH St. Helena

SZ Swaziland

--
[log in to unmask]
http://www.info.usaid.gov/alnk
1111 North 19th Street Suite 210
Arlington, VA 22209 USA
Tel 1-703-235-5415  Fax 1-703-235-3805

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
September 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
October 2009
September 2009
July 2009
June 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
November 2008
October 2008
August 2008
July 2008
April 2008
March 2008
November 2007
August 2007
July 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
November 2005
October 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.HEANET.IE

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager