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CELTIC-L  April 1998

CELTIC-L April 1998

Subject:

Re: Guard Dog

From:

Landen Schooler <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Wed, 15 Apr 1998 12:52:22 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (172 lines)

Netkita,
      Your SPAM is not welcome here on CELTIC-L. Some of us are
sharpening our claymores! ( If you didn't know, it's a large sword )

Landen Schooler

hmm, now that's about sharp enough.....







Netkita wrote:
>
> magine the following scenario. You want to find some details about fine cigars
> from the Dominican Republic that you'd like to buy for a friend. You visit
> Yahoo and type in your request and get the answers you need. A few days later
> you get a call from your insurance company asking if you are still a non-
> smoker and whether your rates should be adjusted.
>
> Could this happen? The technology to do this exists today! And this is only
> the tip of the iceberg. Every time you browse the Web or receive e-mail, you
> expose yourself to the risks of hostile applets and programs that can keep
> track of your Web browsing habits, steal sensitive information or even
> reformat your hard drive!
>
> But, you are now the owner of your own Guard Dog to protect
> you...automatically! Unlike other pets, Guard Dog trains itself so you don't
> have to do anything special. Guard Dog doesn't eat much and it won't poop on
> your desk. But it will bark out a warning when ever there's a threat.
>
> We think he will soon be your new best friend (and he would make an excellent
> cover story too!). If you have any questions on training Guard Dog, please
> call Lisa Stein at 310-664-5487 or send an email to [log in to unmask]
>
>     CyberMedia Announces Immediate Availability of
> Guard Dog Deluxe
>
>         Software product automatically protects PC Users' Privacy and Security on the
> Internet
>
>         SANTA MONICA, CA - - (October 8, 1997) - CyberMediaS, Inc. (NASDAQ\NMS: CYBR)
> today announced the immediate availability of Guard Dog™ Deluxe, the first
> comprehensive personal Internet privacy and security software product designed
> for Microsoft WindowsX 95 users. Originally announced in May 1997 as
> "CyberWall," Guard Dog automatically blocks unwanted "cookies" that can be
> used to monitor a user's Web browsing habits and guards against hostile
> ActiveX controls and Java applets that can delete data files, corrupt hard
> drives or steal sensitive information. Guard Dog also includes full anti-virus
> protection using technology licensed from Trend Micro.
>
>         The product is now available in retail stores throughout North America at an
> estimated retail price of $59.95 and through CyberMedia's Web site at
> www.cybermedia.com.
>
>         Guard Dog incorporates CyberMedia's ActiveHelp™ Technology to automatically
> and continuously update itself via the Internet. When the user clicks on the
> Update button provided, Guard Dog dials into CyberMedia's Web server to
> download the latest program updates and virus patterns so that it can deal
> with the latest virus threats and hacker attacks as they emerge. Users receive
> the Guard Dog update service free of charge for one year from the date of
> purchase.
>
>         Guard Dog's first free update which is available now, includes complete
> support for the recently released Internet Explorer (IE) 4.0 from Microsoft.
> With this update, Guard Dog becomes the first product to provide security and
> privacy for IE 4.0 users.
>
>         "With the explosive growth of the Internet, anti-virus protection is no
> longer enough," said Unni Warrier, president and CEO of CyberMedia. "Guard Dog
> has been specifically designed from the ground up to address the serious new
> privacy and security threats posed by cookies, hostile applets, and Trojan
> Horses."
>
> How Guard Dog Works
>
>         CyberMedia created Guard Dog to protect users against present and future
> security and privacy threats. Guard Dog's Internet Guardian works in the
> background monitoring individual Internet sessions for potentially harmful
> threats. It will notify a user of any attack or intrusion with a barking sound
> much like a real live "guard dog" would.
> Guard Dog protects PC users by building a personal "fireball" around critical
> and sensitive files, such as passwords and financial records. It allows
> permitted applications to access the files, but blocks attempts by
> unauthorized ones.
>
> Unlike traditional anti-virus software which uses a pre-installed database of
> virus "signatures" to detect invasions, Guard Dog's approach enables it to
> continually detect new or unknown attacks. Guard Dog Deluxe:
>
> • Stops unwanted cookies so a user' s actions are not tracked
>
> • Blocks hostile ActiveX Controls and Java applets that can damage a user' s
> PC
>
> • Blocks search requests and other data entered at a Web site from being
> forwarded silently to other sites Monitors all programs and applets for
> suspicious behavior Cleans up trails left behind as users surf the Web
>
> - Protects sensitive information, such as e-mail files, passwords, and other
> personal data so it is not accessed by any unauthorized prograrn.
>
> • Includes full anti-virus protection
>
> Guard Dog also performs a thorough audit to ensure the Internet browser and
> the PC itself are configured appropriately for optimal protection. Since one
> of the most important steps users can take to protect their security is to
> continually update or secure their browser software, Guard Dog alerts the user
> if their browser software is out of date and helps download the latest patch
> or update. Using CyberMedia's ActiveHelp Technology, Guard Dog also keeps
> browsers from passing personal information to other sites and purge the
> browser' s cache, preventing anyone with access to the computer from snooping
> on the user' s Web surfing activity.
>
> Includes full anti-virus protection
>
> Guard Dog's virus check features a complete anti-virus system from Trend
> Micro, one of the world' s leading anti-virus developers. It automatically
> scans each downloaded program, document or e-mail message and removes any
> virus it finds.
>
> Trend's virus protection technology has been chosen for incorporation into
> network security and management products sold by Intel, Oracle, Novell,
> Netscape, Sun Microsystems, Control Data Systems, WorldTalk, and SCO. Trend's
> products have received numerous awards from major trade publications
> including, PC Magazine Editors' Choice (1997).
>
> Anti-virus is Not Enough
>
> Until recently, one of the biggest security risk on the Internet was the
> spread of traditional viruses. With an estimated 11 million people downloading
> software from the Internet every month, the number of virus attacks is on the
> rise. However, while anti-virus technology has evolved to automatically
> eliminate these threats from downloaded programs and e-mail attachments, there
> has been virtually no protection to date against other serious Internetbased
> threats.
>
> - moreThrough the use of cookies and other new technologies, Web sites can now
> track a user's Web browsing habits and search requests. The United States
> Senate recently commissioned a series of public hearings to highlight these
> serious issues and is currently considering legislation to combat some of
> these threats.
>
> Another vulnerable area is electronic commerce which is projected to grow to
> as much as $12 billion by the year 2000. The security issues relating to this
> area have become paramount. Unless users rely on a Secure Socket Link (SSL),
> hackers can easily decrypt messages to retrieve credit card and other
> pertinent information.
>
> Anti-virus software is also unable to address many of the most widely
> publicized threats discovered in 1997, including the Chaos Computer Club's
> ActiveX control which tricks Quicken into removing money from a user's bank
> account and the infamous Trojan Horse, "AOL4FREE.com" program, which when
> downloaded erases a user's hard drive.
>
> "We think that every Windows 95 user with an Internet connection needs a
> product like Guard Dog," said Warrier. "It' s the safe, easy way to ward off
> today' s nasty new threats."
>
> System Requirements
>
> Runs on any IBM or 1 00-percent compatible 486 or higher PC. Requires Windows
> 95, 8 MB RAM minimum, a hard drive with a minimum of 6 MB free disk space,
> 256-color VGA monitor and an existing Internet connection.
>
> Pricing and Availability
>
> Available in retail stores in the U.S. and Canada now, for an estimated retail
> price of $59.95 U.S.

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