LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.5

Help for AFRIK-IT Archives


AFRIK-IT Archives

AFRIK-IT Archives


AFRIK-IT@LISTSERV.HEANET.IE


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

AFRIK-IT Home

AFRIK-IT Home

AFRIK-IT  October 1997

AFRIK-IT October 1997

Subject:

Changes in the wind

From:

"Getachew, Dan" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

African Network of IT Experts and Professionals (ANITEP) List

Date:

Tue, 14 Oct 1997 08:09:44 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (110 lines)

Greetings All,

It seems that there are some changes finally taking place in
the way the Ethiopian Telecom will be progressing. I have attached
and article below that I received just this morning.  One thing that
quickly comes to mind is, are we in for a "new" form of colonization ?
Where this time we are not being ruled by governments but  by big
corporations.  And what can and should the governments do to be able to
direct and monitor the opening of these markets ??

Do not get me wrong.  I completely agree that it is indeed absolutely
necessary
to open the market, but I am just looking for some lessons learned from
others
who have already gone through with this phase of change.  How should the
policy
be structured to ensure that change is not only coming to the "high
income" end
of the spectrum, but indeed that the free flow of information does
benefit the masses.

For this is indeed the key, I think for the future of Africa.  Not only
do we need to
bring in technology to the continent, but we also need to ensure that
its benefits
are also spread out.

Dan


Source: The Indian Ocean Newsletter October  11, 1997

           After having steadfastly refused to open up its
       telecommunications to the private sector, the  Ethiopian
       government may now have to soften its stand following strong
       pressure from the World Bank and International Monetary Fund
       (an IMF delegation is expected in Addis Ababa shortly) and
       some manoeuvres by the South Korean conglomerate Daewoo. IMF
       has already delayed the release of a tranche of its
       structural adjustment credit line (of US$ 120 million over
       three years) because the  Ethiopian  authorities bluntly
       refused total liberalization of foreign exchange
       transactions and reduction of interest rates today still
       well above the 5 percent official inflation figure. But a
       much more prickly subject of discord is opposing the World
       Bank and  Ethiopian  leaders in Addis

       Ababa: decontrolling telecommunications. Ever since they
       swept to power in 1991, Ethiopian  People's Revolutionary
       Democratic Front (EPRDF) officials have consistently
       sidetracked any idea of abandoning, even partially, the
       state monopoly here, for both economic and political
       reasons. Even the country's recent connection to the well-
       known Internet has failed to stop  Ethiopian
       Telecommunications Corporation (ETC) from hanging on as the
       sole information service provider (ISP), at exorbitant
       prices. Although ETC no longer comes directly under the
       authority of the ministry of communications (as its
       predecessor ETA had), its board of directors is dominated by
       government representatives. The World Bank wants to see much
       broader decontrol in this sector, even as some form of
       privatization. As result, Daewoo and to a lesser extent its
       competitor Samsung are lining up to get on the wagon.

           Daewoo is hoping to repeat in  Ethiopia  the
       breakthrough it made in Eritrea: after managing to get a
       footing (today in several economic sectors in partnership
       with state-owned companies or with the ruling party in
       Asmara), Daewoo has set up a new joint venture on the same
       lines so it can join in privatization of Eritrean
       telecommunications. The Koreans achieved their result with
       only a few months aggressive prospecting: following head of
       state Issayas Afeworki's official visit to South Korea in
       April, a large Daewoo delegation went to Asmara to tie up
       the project. Daewoo is now banking on an identical scenario
       in  Ethiopia.  So after  Ethiopian  officials' visit to
       South Korea,

       representatives of the Korean cartel went to Addis Ababa
       where they are believedto have had talks with Mega Net
       Corporation, with the aim of obtaining a cellular telephone
       licence or perhaps the status as the country's second
       telcommunications operator, alongside ETC.

           Established in 1993 by officials of Tigray People's
       Liberation Front (TPLF, the hard-core of EPRDF), Mega Net
       Corporation has now joined the Endowment Fund for the
       Rehabilitation of Tigray (EFFORT) consortium chaired by
       former defence minister Seye Abraha. It has also greatly
       developed its activities (printing, advertising,
       communications) thanks to good relations with the
       government. At the beginning of 1997, Mega Net swallowed up
       Shala Advertising Enterprise, a company headed by an
       official of the TPLF information service, Assefa Mammo.
       Itssubsidiary, Mega Creative Arts Centre, is going to
       construct the country's firstamphitheatre. In fact, although
       her name does not appear as a Mega Net shareholder, prime
       minister Meles Zenawi's wife Azieb Mesfin (better known
       underthe name Lemlem Mesfin) is believed to be the real
       power behind the scenes. So the World Bank has a new battle
       to win with the  Ethiopian  government: to insist that
       decontrol of telecommunications is made via an international
       Call for bids, and not, as appears to be happening already,
       by mutual agreement amongfriends.

Dan Getachew
Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space
Advanced Technology Center
(415)424 - 2429

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
September 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
October 2009
September 2009
July 2009
June 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
November 2008
October 2008
August 2008
July 2008
April 2008
March 2008
November 2007
August 2007
July 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
November 2005
October 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.HEANET.IE

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager