LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for CELTIC-L Archives


CELTIC-L Archives

CELTIC-L Archives


CELTIC-L@LISTSERV.HEANET.IE


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Monospaced Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CELTIC-L Home

CELTIC-L Home

CELTIC-L  January 1996

CELTIC-L January 1996

Subject:

St. Brigid's(Ireland) Day Customs/Foods

From:

CONRAD BLADEY <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

CELTIC-L - The Celtic Culture List.

Date:

Fri, 26 Jan 1996 21:12:24 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (244 lines)

St. Brigids Day Foods:
 
1.Colcannon for 6
1 1/4 lbs. Kale or green Cabbage,2 cups water,1 tablespoon olive oil,1
1/4 pounds peeled and quartered potatoes.1 tablespoon chopped parsley, 1
cup cleaned and chopped leeks white part only,1 cup milk,pinch of ground
mace,salt and ground pepper to taste, 1/2 cup melted butter (use real
butter)
1.simmer kale or cabbage in 2 cups water and oil for 10 minutes ,drain
chop fine.
2.boil potatoes and water simmer till tender
3.simmer the leeks in milk for ten minutes till tender
4.drain and puree the potatoes
5.add leeks and their milk and cooked kale.
6.mix add mace salt and pepper.
7.mound on a plate and pour on the melted butter.Garnish with parsley.
 
Boxty Cakes:
1/2 pound hot cooked potatoes,i/2 pound grated raw potatoes,2 cups
flour,1 teaspoon baking soda,1-1 1/2
cups butermilk,butter for frying,salt and pepper.
1.drain peel and mash the hot potatoes
2.stir in the raw potatoes,flour and baking soda
3.add salt and pepper to taste
4.mix well with enough buttermilk to make a stiff batter
5.Shape into 3 inch patties about 1/4 inch thick.
6.fry on hot greased griddled until crispy and golden on both sides makes 12.
St. Brigids Oaten Bread
1 cup flour,1 tablespoon sugar,3/4 teaspoon baking powder,1/4 teaspoon
baking soda,1/4 teaspoon salt.,3 tablespoons butter in small pieces,3/4
cup uncooked oatmeal flakes. 1 egg,1/2 cup buttermilk
 
1.heat oven to 425 degrees
2. grease baking sheet
3.combine flour sugar baking powder,baking soda and salt in bowl and mix
4.Add butter bits and cut in with knife until mixture is crumbly.
5.add oats and toss to combine
6.in other bowl beat egg with buttermilk
7.make a well in the dry ingredients pour in the egg mixture and mix with
a fork until crumbs hold together.Make dough into ball and transfer to
floured surface.Knead 20-25 times add flour if sticky.
8.pat dough into 8 inch round and trnsfer to baking sheet.
9.score a deep cross into the bread but do not cut it through
10.bake 15-20 minutes till brown.
(may be formed into a wheat sheaf for feb 1 and left out over night for
the saint.
 
Sources:
Rendell,Joan Your Book of Corn Dollies.,London 1976.
Danaher,Kevin. The Year in ireland.,Mercier Press,Cork,1972.
Sandford,Lettice.,Straw Work and Corn Dollies.,Viking,N.Y.
1974.
Svinicki, Eunice.,Making Nice Things out of Straw.,
McKay,N.y.
 
St.Brigid
Historical Brigid-Abbess of Kildare
 
The name Kildare (church of the oak possibly refers to the Oak grove
sacred before Christianity in which the Abbey was set. But also when
Brigid took her vows there the dead wood of the altar grew green leaves
and lived from that time on)
Kildare was the home of a perpetual fire tended many years after the
historical Brigid died (first quarter of the 6th century). The Romans
equated the saint to minerva but this was inaccurate.
She was a multivalent(many powered ) deity in Celtic times and is linked
to the hearth,home,cattle and farm animals as well as with farm
produce.She was a healer.Patron of smiths,poets and healers-a tripartite
(three part) deity -a typical Celtic type of figure with three parts.
 
It is said that she found her cross on the floor of the home of a pagan
chieftain who was dying of the fever. She wanted to convert the pagan and
looking around for a method found the cross - converted him just before
death.
 
There are many many short stories (which I tell)about saint Brigid.
 
Poem Closely Associated with Brigid
 
I should like to have a great pool of Ale
 
I should like to have a great pool of ale for the King of Kings
I should like the heavenly Host to be drinking it for all eternity.
 
I should like to have the fruit of Faith of pure devotion,I should like
to have the couches of Holiness in my house.
 
I should like to have the men of Heaven in my own dwelling
I should like the vats of long suffering to be at their disposal
 
I should like to have the vessels of Charity to dispense should like to
have the pitchers of mercy for their company
 
I should like there to be cheerfulness for their sake I I should like
Jesus to be there too.
 
I should like to have the three marys of glorious renown I should like to
have the people of heaven from every side
 
I should like to be vassal to the Lord if I should suffer distress he
would grant me a good blessing.
 
10th Century AD Translated from the Gaelic by Kenneth H. Jackson from
Greene,David,H. Random House,1954,p.32.
Saint Brigid a.k.a. The Mary of the Gael
 
her day: February 1
                   First Day of Spring
                   the beginning of imbolc:Season of light
 
(alternate spelling- Brighid)
 
Brigid means Fiery Arrow
She is patroness of cattle and of dairy work
 
1. A day to look for weather signs-a hedgehog a good weather sign
if he stays out of his burrow.
 
2.do only essential work on the day and go to the local shrine to pray.
 
3.Take stock of the household supplies-will it last till harvest
 
4.Clean the house
 
5. Make a special dinner for St. Brighids Eve
 
6. Make a Bairin-breac-yeast cake with fruit.(aka barm brack)
for the eve and invite the neighbors in.
 
7.Make fresh butter-Brigid is closely associated with the dairy.
 
8.A day for the wealthy to give food to the poor.
 
9.St. Brigid traveled the countryside blessing households with her white
red eared cow.
 
10.You need to show her welcome:place bread and fresh butter on the
window sill outside,also put out a sheaf of corn for the cow,put out
rushes for her to kneel on to bless the household,set the table in the
kitchen on the eve.
 
11.Make the cros Bride or bogha Bride (St. Brigids Cross)
These crosses are made of rushes-but vary in materials and somewhat in
design from region to region(see drawing).
 
12.The cross should be hung in the thatch roof of the house or above the
door and if you dont have a roof-apartment-on the inside of the front door.
 
13. Cross material should be blessed.Crosses are left in place for a full
year to be renewed on the day.
 
14. a large oat bread cake a Strone in the shape of a wheat sheaf or
cross is made,blessed by the priest and eaten.
 
15.Often a door ceremony is held with a person-eldest daughter
representing the saint knocking and asking to be let in:
it is said- go on your knees,open your eyes, and let Brighid in
answered by from within: Greeting,greeting to the noble woman.
 
16.After perhaps Mary Brigid is the most common name for girls in
Ireland- it is shortened to Bridie (pronounced bri dee)
(Bride in English however comes from the German but many think otherwise
the linguists insist a German root.)
 
17.On the eve the Bridie Boys go out with an effigy of the saint called
the Brideog-a doll dressed in white-they pick up the offerings of bread
and of butter left out.(in some areas the Brideog was the most pure girl
of the village)
 
18.A piece of white cloth is hung outside the front door.
 
19.Those coming around would say something like this:
 
Something for poor Biddy!
Her clothes are torn
Her shoes are worn
Something for poor Biddy
 
or
Here is Briget dressed in white
Give her a penny for her night
She is deaf she is dumb
She cannot talk without a tongue.
 
or
Here comes Brigid dressed in white
Giver her something for the night
She is deaf,she is dumb
For Gods sake give her some
 
20. A silk ribbon is left out for the Saint to bless it is used to cure
illness. the ribin Brighid St.Brigids Ribbon.
 
21. To say over the cross:
Brighids Girdle is my girdle
The Girdle with the four crosses
Arise housewife
And go out three times
May whoever goes through my girdle
Be seven times better a year from now
 
22.The leftover materials from the cross were used to bless the animals
as bedding and feed.
 
23.On St Brigins day the lark was a good omen of Spring
 
24The dandelion is spoken of as Brigids Flower
 
25. Hoar frost(thick frost) gathered specially on the day can be used to
cure headache.
 
26. There are many wells dedicated to the saint from which water is drawn
and used for blessings on the day.
 
27.Brigid is famous for brewing ale and for distributing it -so ale is a
part of the celebration
 
28.The farm animals should be especially well taken care of on the day.
 
Throughout Ireland there is considerable variation and these customs are
documented for each individual region but are basically the same.
Today in Ireland the Irish are adopting international culture-it would
not be unusual for an Irish man or woman not to celebrate the day at all
or to follow the old customs
Source:
a great source-
 
Kevin Danaher,The Year in Ireland.,The Mercier Press,Cork,
Ireland,1972.
his observations are also well documented to scientific publications.
Conrad Bladey
 
 
************************************************************************
INTERNET FOR PEASANTS AND PAUPERS---a Course in Inexpensive,Free and Public
Net.access.Balto.Md.USA.registration ongoing. Courses in:IRISH CULTURE,FOLK
MUSIC OF IRELAND and the IRISH PUB- registration also ongoing!-------!!!!!
****Organizer in Chief of the International TIN WHISTLE FESTIVAL Dunfanaghy
1996-Summer!!!!Interested???Write for details!............y'all come!
 
!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!^!>>>>
[log in to unmask] O===o===o===o===o===o===o===([O]}>>>O
************************************************************************
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
November 2016
August 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
March 2015
February 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
August 2014
June 2014
May 2014
February 2014
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995
April 1995
March 1995
February 1995
January 1995
December 1994
November 1994
October 1994
September 1994
August 1994
July 1994
June 1994
May 1994
April 1994
March 1994
February 1994
January 1994
December 1993
November 1993
October 1993
September 1993
August 1993
July 1993
June 1993
May 1993
April 1993
March 1993
February 1993
January 1993
December 1992
November 1992
October 1992
September 1992
August 1992
July 1992
June 1992
May 1992
April 1992
March 1992
February 1992
January 1992
December 1991
November 1991
October 1991
September 1991
August 1991
July 1991
June 1991
May 1991

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.HEANET.IE

Secured by F-Secure Anti-Virus CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager