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CELTIC-L  July 1994

CELTIC-L July 1994

Subject:

Re: Celts not flower children

From:

Anelle Kloski <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

CELTIC-L - The Celtic Culture List.

Date:

Sat, 9 Jul 1994 16:52:06 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (36 lines)

The message about Celts not being "Flower Sniffing Hippies" brings up
some interesting areas for consideration.  Not scholarly areas, perhaps,
but ones which concern our perceptions of "Celts" - which is part of what
I see this list as exploring.  In his fascinating book CRACKER CULTURE:
CELTIC WAYS IN THE OLD SOUTH, Grady McWhiney says that the American South
was influenced heavily by immigrants from the "Celtic fringe" of Britain,
and that this often resulted in fighting and other belligerant types of
behavior.  Having been born in the South (well, Texas is kind of the
South) I can attest to the fact that the culture is different that that
in other parts of America in many ways.  And one of those ways concerns
being militant - carrying guns, liking to fight, etc.  My father never
actually fought in any wars, having been invalided out of WWI by the
Spanish flu.  But I remember him saying about one of his friends during
WWII:  "That guy has no fear, or even common sense: he would go charging
against the Germans just for fun!  He never liked to work, or do anything
boring, but he thinks war is fun!"  I think the South was known for such
characters, and statistics would probably bear me out.  I remember
hearing that the South had more war "heroes" and more war casualties than
other parts of the country.  Perhaps this is the Celtic influence which
McWhiney says is as distinctive as is another trait: a great ability to
enjoy leisure in all its forms.  And that is where flower sniffing might
come in too!
 
My grandfather evidently liked talking with his friends in the local
saloon, then they would go out back and punch each other around, before
going back in to continue their conversation.  So they could hardly be
called "peace loving".  But I also do not see them as highly regimented
warriors, or easy to control soldiers in a war.  I personally believe
that this strong streak of independence - which sometimes manifests
itself in pugilism - also is characteristic of persons who do not want to
fight (or do anything) for impersonal reasons.  Celts make great
warriors, or great hippies, too, if they want to do that.  My own
definition of a Celt might be: A flower sniffing warrior. How's that?
 
Anelle Kloski

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