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Subject: Re: Carrick Brauda - Astronomers' Circles
From: Anthony Murphy <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Scholars and students of Old Irish <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Sat, 18 Oct 2008 11:27:53 +0100
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As it happens, the townland of Carrickbroad is marked on the OS Discovery
map (thanks Janet!) and it's exactly five kilometres due north of the site
of Ireland's Stone Henge. There are two fairly prominent hills between the
Stone Henge site and Slieve Gullion - you can see them in reverse in this
photo taken from Slieve Gullion -
http://www.mythicalireland.com/photos/july2007.php . 

On the map, one hill is called Tievecrom (An Taobh Crom?) and the other
Daaikilmore. (Yes, two As). That second name is not Irish surely? I don't
think I've ever seen anything like it. But right beside it is the name
Carrickbroad.

>Carrickbroad is a townland (rather than a feature such as a dolmen or 
>cairn). So perhaps it took its name from a nearby feature, and Carrick 
>Brauda is a related attempt to render the Irish name into an English one.

Looks that way alright. I've found that place names and character names in
myth are regularly spelt a half dozen different ways depending on the
source! Just looking through Google Books for Carrickbroad I found a
reference to a "large roung cairn on the "mountain" - see
http://books.google.co.uk/books?q=cairn+carrickbroad&btnG=Search+Books

>Have you checked the Ordinance Survey Letters for Louth and Armagh? (I 
>checked the chapter on Armagh in the 'Historic Monuments of Northern 
>Ireland', but drew a blank.)

No, I only have the Louth OS letters, not Armagh. But I will check the
Ulster Place-Name Society for this and other things as suggested by Deb C.

Thanks,
Anthony.

>
>The form 'Brauda' is most unlikely to be Irish I think, more likely an 
>Anglicisation of something Irish (just like 'Carrick').
>
>Carrickbroad is a townland (rather than a feature such as a dolmen or 
>cairn). So perhaps it took its name from a nearby feature, and Carrick 
>Brauda is a related attempt to render the Irish name into an English one.
>
>Have you checked the Ordinance Survey Letters for Louth and Armagh? (I 
>checked the chapter on Armagh in the 'Historic Monuments of Northern 
>Ireland', but drew a blank.)
>
>Neil

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