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Subject: Re: Imbolc - milking?
From: Clodagh Downey <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Scholars and students of Old Irish <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Tue, 23 Oct 2001 11:56:33 +0100
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David wrote:


Fromad cach bíd iar n-urd
issed dlegair i n-imbulc
díunnach laime is coissi is cinn
is amlaid sin at·berim

A test of each meal according to the order,
this is what is due at Imbolc.
Washing the hand, the foot and the head,
This is what I say.

The rhyme urd :: imbulc would point to a voiced final /g/ of Imbolc,
which would speak against a derivation from *imm·folcai. I am not
sure about the rules of Old Irish versification, but would they allow
a rhyme of a voiced consonant with a voiceless one after a liquid? I
don't think so, but I could be wrong.


I don't think it would be unheard of to have consonants from these classes
rhyming with each other; Gerard Murphy gives the (unusual) example
sétaigfit: béccaichfit [internal rhyme between -t- and -cc-] from SR and
points out that the poet probably recognised the imperfection (_Early Irish
Metrics_ p. 33).  In any case, consonant clusters are generally subject to
more relaxed rhyming rules than single consonants (EIM p. 32).

Clodagh

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