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CELTIC-L  June 2000

CELTIC-L June 2000

Subject:

Re: Solstice

From:

Lois Chadwell Cruz <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Lois Chadwell Cruz <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Thu, 29 Jun 2000 01:44:51 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (56 lines)

>         BTW, you've brought up another factor/issue that the advocate of
> logic may not be aware of in making her categorical assertions: the
changes
> that occurred when the calendar shifted from Julian to Gregorian.

I could well be more knowledgable in this area than you are, Francine, thank
you for patronizing me though.

The Julian
> calendar was initially that used in countries under Roman influence and
> later those under Christian influence. However, it was found not to allow
> for the slight uneven-ness in each year.

It calculated the year as being about 11 minutes longer than it actually is.
A tiny annual error, but amounting to days over the centuries during which
this calendar was the standard.

> This was compensated for in the
> Gregorian calendar by the addition of one day in leap year. However, by
this
> time Christianity had split into several groups and Protestant governments
> were unwilling to accept and use a calendar devised under Catholic
auspices.
> By the time countries under English control--this includes
Ireland--adopted
> the Gregorian calendar, there was an 11-day difference.

In 1582 when the error was corrected, the difference amounted to 10 days.
Pope Gregory made an official pronouncement of the corrected calendar and
the Roman Catholic nations immediately fell in line. 4 October 1582 was
followed immediately the next day by 15 October 1582. The English did not
begin using this calendar until 1752, partly in resistance to the Catholic
origin, and partly because the people raised such a protest over having 10
days taken from their lives! So if one reads a Spanish document dated, for
example, 11 May 1600, and an English document dated 1 May 1600, they are
actually dated on the same day.

In Celtic areas,
> theere was a lot of deliberation over whether to continue celebrating the
> traditional feasts on the "natural" day--Aug 11, Feb 11, May 11, or Nov.
> 11--or use the calendar day. Thus Martinmas became known as "old Samhain"
> because they coincided.
>
>         BTW, the use of Martinmas and Whitsunday are excellent examples of
> "drift" where Christian feasts have substituted for pre-Christian ones.
Lady
> Day--Annunciation, 25 Mar--is a spring equinox and Michaelmas is a
> substitute for fall equinox.

Not much drift involved, since the vernal equinox can fall anytime between
20-23 March, and autumnal equinox between 20-23 September. Same for the
solstices, in Dec. and June.  One might say that the 25th day of the month
was a "safe" day to pick to make sure the solar event had occurred.

Lois

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