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AFRIK-IT  May 2000

AFRIK-IT May 2000

Subject:

Re: Nigeria - internet

From:

"Ndiribe A. A. Ndiribe" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

African Network of IT Experts and Professionals (ANITEP) List

Date:

Fri, 12 May 2000 18:05:42 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (68 lines)

Well Erick,
Mobile phones are more widely used in Nigeria. Whether they are reliable is
another issue. You are 'a nobody' in Nigeria unless you have a cellular
phone.
I did not say that echelon operated from embassies. I said that there are
gadgets that boast of deciphering comsigs (to use the trade name for it)
If for instance you need a broadband scanner, you will have problems with
frequency and its associated interference's. Possibly you can locate the
conversation without knowing the numbers etc.
All said, the point is that we have security problems that have to be
addressed. How these problems are addressed depends on our own choice of
technology, not other's choice of technology. We may decide to go it the
clumsiest way if in our judgement that makes us more secure. There is no law
that states that speed must be the first and overriding factor in choice of
technology.
Thanks
Ndiribe
----- Original Message -----
From: Eric S Johnson <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2000 4:52 PM
Subject: Re: Nigeria - internet


>
>
> ndribe,
>
> > The point could be considered this way. Assume that you have a thousand
> > telephone lines and a clandestine organization wants to listen into all
> of
>
> i'm not addressing whether echelon exists (it does) and where it operates
> out of (not, as a rule, embassies). i'm just pointing out that GSM is much
> harder to listen in to. so if your concern (or the government's concern)
is
> security, the situation in NG right now is extremely poor: it's very easy
> to
> listen in to the existing analog conversations using off-the-shelf
> consumer-grade multi-band radio receivers. a switch to GSM would make it
> considerably harder to listen in. any slowdown in GSM implementation in NG
> that's attributed to security is a smokescreen for other reasons.
>
> the reason GSM is not widely used in the US has nothing to do with
security
> and/or government clearance (other, far more secure, digital mobile phones
> have been in use in the US for some time). it's merely that it's a newer
> technology that came along after huge amounts were invested in building an
> analog infrastructure, and so as new systems are implemented to replace
the
> overburdened analog ones, the newer ones generally are leapfrogging over
> GSM
> to the next generation (just as, in its own time, europe leapfrogged over
> analog directly to GSM).
>
> > In Nigeria, cellular phone was almost replacing the ordinary phones
until
> > this sad revelation.
>
> i don't agree. when i'm in nigeria i find the mobile to be extremely
> unreliable and for that reason not very widely used, whether by
government,
> business, or individual--even in lagos, not to mention in other cities.
>
> best,
> eric
>

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