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AFRIK-IT  May 2000

AFRIK-IT May 2000

Subject:

Re: Nigeria - internet

From:

"Ndiribe A. A. Ndiribe" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

African Network of IT Experts and Professionals (ANITEP) List

Date:

Fri, 12 May 2000 16:16:47 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (61 lines)

Hi Eric,
The point could be considered this way. Assume that you have a thousand
telephone lines and a clandestine organization wants to listen into all of
them. It has only two ways of doing it. If it controls the telephone
company, it can listen in at the point of distribution that is at the
exchange, the telephone company. (This is what happens, for instance, in the
United States where law enforcement has to obtain clearance from either the
court or the congress to wiretap the conversations of a suspect). By the way
,senior officers of British Telecomm with security clearance were known to
have worked in the Echelon project I referred to in my last discussion. So
otherwise legitimate-looking foreign telecomm companies fronting for
clandestine organizations cannot be ruled out. Now if this clandestine
organization  has no access to such an exchange, it must resort to a more
direct method such as physically wiretapping the line. If these lines are
dispersed in space, say from Kano to Portharcourt, this becomes physically
hard if not impossible.
Coming to cellular phone, a company in South Florida, USA, boasts of
producing the goldfinger gadget which collects information from the 'ether'.
This it says will enable law enforcement officers not only to eavesdrop into
what is being said but also establish the number being called. Now a
diplomatic mission is like a sovereign state. Assume that one mission in a
country decides to treat the leadership of the host country as 'potential
criminals' to use the cover here, what happens? It will simply stay within
the premises of its embassy and collect as much information as it wants
through cellular phone conversations by the leaders of the target country.
In Nigeria, cellular phone was almost replacing the ordinary phones until
this sad revelation. This is why resort to the other form is being made.
There are other issues which I have no time to discuss here but you can find
out more about these issues in my website www.strategiesdirect.com. It may
interest you to know that only last week did the US accept that GSM
technology could be used for 'close monitoring' thereby clearing it for
civilian use, for instance in monitoring pipelines etc. Nigeria has already
ordered some for this purpose.
I hope this meets with your acceptance.
Ndiribe A. A. Ndiribe
----- Original Message -----
From: Eric S Johnson <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2000 1:45 PM
Subject: Re: Nigeria - internet


>
>
> ndribe,
>
> > This gentleman was appointed just about a month ago. So you can
> understand
> > why GSM is being considered with caution while the analog
> > telephone system,
> > the usual portable telephone is being strengthened. We have valid
> security
>
> i'm curious--why strengthen analog? analog is much easier to listen in on
> than GSM. from a security point of view, GSM would be an advancement, not
a
> step backwards.
>
> best, eric
>

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